WHICH AKAI MPC SHOULD I BUY? WHICH MPC IS THE BEST?

Last Updated: June 6, 2016 By Sean wirerealm.com drum machine samplers and sequencers have been dominating the music
industry in terms of music production centers for decades (first came industry in terms of music production centers for decades (first cameout in 1984). Used by most professional music artists for _any_ genrethat exists (typically hip hop for sampling, but anything goes), thesepowerful machines can transform your songs into beautiful movements ofsounds. If you’re ready to take your music to the next level and buyan Akai MPC, we wanted to do the research and see which is best foryour specific needs. Do you absolutely _need_ a drum machine to makequality music? Not necessarily, as numerous artists all over the worlduse their computer and/or keyboards to create their sounds. However,if you like the analog route, or merely want to combine it _with_ yourcomputer with a digital audio workstation wirerealm.com other music production equipment wirerealm.com you’ve chosen the right machine to do so. You might also beperforming live and want some pads to pound in front of your audience.Here is a simple guide to help you determine which MPC to buy.Our first answer we can give you is: there is no such thing as _thebest Akai MPC._ Everyone will give you a different answer to thisquestion, especially if you search around the net. Most people tellyou the MPC they’ve personally used. They definitely appearednumerous times in our best drum machine wirerealm.com a reason, but which particular model is to be determined. We’ve beenable to try quite a few of these awesome machines and have searched upand down the internet for reviews and feedback on each model to spellit out for you.

AKAI MPC STUDIO



Akai’s newest and most advanced MPC’s today. First of all, the
MPC Studio is super sleek. It’s under one inch thin and has a really MPC Studio is super sleek. It’s under one inch thin and has a reallynice alimunimum body. This is a newer version of the MPC, which aimsto incorporate the drum machine into a computer-based setup. The padsare MPC-quality (as always by Akai), so they’re the best in the bizin terms of feel. Portability is great with this since it’s thinsize. The LCD screen is nice as well. Users around the net have statedthat the Studio is great for price and DAW software incorporationsince it’s only $400. Some have compared it to the MPC Element sincethey both incorporated an MPC pad type of rig with computerintegration, but it’s a bit more expensive (the Element is only$150). The Studio has some more software and sounds that come with it,as well as a few more capabilities in terms of DAW integration.MAIN FEATURES: Simple computer integration to act as a MIDI padcontroller or other MPC production tasks with your tech-based setup,1″ thin, includes MPC software, 128-track sequencing, 16 backlit MPCpads, USB-powered (no adapter hassle), big LCD screen, four knobs thatare touch-sensitive for control in the MPC software, 8 pad banks, 7GBsound library, mapping and real-time fiddling with VST’s.WHY YOU SHOULD GET IT: You want a step up from the MPC Element andreally want an MPC to supplement your computer-based setup.WHY YOU SHOULDN’T: If you’re looking for a more vintage type ofMPC with a warm sound. This is more digital, and is made specificallyfor computers. Also, if you don’t need the MPC software, itdoesn’t seem worth it.

WHY YOU SHOULDN’T:



* It is relatively costly due to the rarity of the machine (ifyou’re going to drop this amount of money, you might as well go withsomething more new)* It is 99% most likely used* It is outdated, no new software updates or fixes (you’re on yourown with everything)* Only good for above mentions, not good for stand-alone nowadays

WHY YOU SHOULDN’T:



* It is relatively costly due to the rarity of the machine (ifyou’re going to drop this amount of money, you might as well go withsomething more new)* It is 99% most likely used* It is outdated, no new software updates or fixes (you’re on yourown with everything)* Only good for above mentions, not good for stand-alone nowadays


WHY YOU SHOULDN’T:



* It is relatively costly due to the rarity of the machine (ifyou’re going to drop this amount of money, you might as well go withsomething more new)* It is 99% most likely used* It is outdated, no new software updates or fixes (you’re on yourown with everything)* Only good for above mentions, not good for stand-alone nowadays

TIMING?



I first heard that idea discussed in the early 80s, shortly after Iintroduced the LM-1. A part of me would love to tell you it’ssomething ethereal, a sort of _secret sauce _that only I canachieve. But honestly, nothing more than what I’ve written in thefirst answer above is required to create great grooves.> I discovered swing and note quantizing by accident... I decided to> call a bug a feature.

WHY YOU SHOULDN’T:



* It is relatively costly due to the rarity of the machine (ifyou’re going to drop this amount of money, you might as well go withsomething more new)* It is 99% most likely used* It is outdated, no new software updates or fixes (you’re on yourown with everything)* Only good for above mentions, not good for stand-alone nowadays

WHY YOU SHOULDN’T:



* It is relatively costly due to the rarity of the machine (ifyou’re going to drop this amount of money, you might as well go withsomething more new)* It is 99% most likely used* It is outdated, no new software updates or fixes (you’re on yourown with everything)* Only good for above mentions, not good for stand-alone nowadays

AKAI MPC RENAISSANCE



powerful machine available. They describe it as their fusing of theMPC layout and workflow with computer incorporation. It’s the newestand more tech-friendly MPC, as Akai has felt pressure to start makingproducts (including their MPC’s) to pertain to the computer movementof the digital music world. They also include a huge 9 GB samplelibrary with sounds from the 3000 and other expansions. Pro ToolsExpress is also included in the box, so if you’re looking for somesoftware to make your music, this is definitely a great package forsome money saving. Reviews around the net have talked about the“MPC Ren”‘s construction being sturdy as well as the pads havingthat legendary MPC feel. Edit functioning is relatively simple forlooping. The step mode’s a plus and as we spoke about previously,the software bundle is killer if you’re going to be using it. Buythe MPC Ren if you want the newest MPC out there that’ll keep yousatisfied, especially if you need the software.MAIN FEATURES:  Incorporates computer and MPC collaboration, 16backlit MPC pads, 16 Q-Link controls, clear LCD screen, Pro ToolsExpress included, four channel USB 2.0 ports, up to 8 pad banks (mostof any MPC), MIDI ins and outs (2 in and 4 out), 128-track sequencing,9GB sound library included, works with both Mac and PC.WHY YOU SHOULD GET ONE: If you want the newest MPC, are serious aboutyour music, or want to incorporate this with a computer-based rig.Perfect supplement for your setup.WHY YOU SHOULDN’T: If you’re looking for a more vintage,traditional drum machine. The earlier versions aren’t nearly asdigital. That’s based on your preference.TYPICAL PRICE: The MPC Renaissance’s run for about $1000. Some areused, but most new since it just recently came out.





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